Glossary

ALIENATION. In real property law. The transfer of the property and possession of lands, tenements, or other things, from one person to another. Termes de la Ley. It is particularly applied to absolute conveyances of real property. 1 N. Y. 20, 294.
The act by which the title to real estate is voluntarily resigned by one person to another and accepted by the latter, in the forms prescribed by law. See 24 N. H. 558; 11 Barb. 629; 31 Ill. 119.
In medical jurisprudence. A generic term denoting the different kinds of aberration of the human understanding. 1 Beck, Med. Jur. 535.
Source: Henry Campbell Black, Black's Law Dictionary, 1st edition, (Saint Paul, Minn.: West Publishing Co., 1891), 59; image reprint, CD-ROM, A Dictionary Of Law (Columbia, Maryland: Archive CD Books USA, 2006).

ATTORN. In feudal law. To transfer or turn over to another. Where a lord aliened his seigniory, he might, with the consent of the tenant, and in some cases without, attorn or transfer the homage and service of the latter to the alienee or new lord. Bract. fols. 81b, 82.
In modern law. To consent to the transfer or a rent or reversion. A tenant is said to attorn when he agrees to become the tenant of the person to whom the reversion has been granted. See Attornment.
Source: Henry Campbell Black, Black's Law Dictionary, 1st edition, (Saint Paul, Minn.: West Publishing Co., 1891), 104; image reprint, CD-ROM, A Dictionary Of Law (Columbia, Maryland: Archive CD Books USA, 2006).

ATTORNMENT. In feudal and old English law. A turning over or transfer by a lord of the services of his tenant to the grantee of his seigniory.
Attornment is the act of a person who holds a leasehold interest in land, or estate for life or years, by which he agrees to become the tenant of a stranger who has acquired the fee in the land, or the remainder or reversion, or the right to the rent or services by which the tenant holds.
Source: Henry Campbell Black, Black's Law Dictionary, 1st edition, (Saint Paul, Minn.: West Publishing Co., 1891), 105; image reprint, CD-ROM, A Dictionary Of Law (Columbia, Maryland: Archive CD Books USA, 2006).

PROPRIETARY. A proprietor or owner; one who has the exclusive title to a thing; one who possesses or holds the title to a thing in his own right. The grantees of Pennsylvania and Maryland and their heirs were called the proprietaries of those provinces. Webster.
Source: Henry Campbell Black, Black's Law Dictionary, 1st edition, (Saint Paul, Minn.: West Publishing Co., 1891), 955; image reprint, CD-ROM, A Dictionary Of Law (Columbia, Maryland: Archive CD Books USA, 2006).

QUITRENT. Certain established rents of the freeholders and ancient copyholders of manors are denominated "quitrents," because thereby the tenant goes quit and free of all other services. 3 Cruise, Dig. 314.
Source: Henry Campbell Black, Black's Law Dictionary, 1st edition, (Saint Paul, Minn.: West Publishing Co., 1891), 986; image reprint, CD-ROM, A Dictionary Of Law (Columbia, Maryland: Archive CD Books USA, 2006).

SASSAFRAS, SAUSSFRIE. The wood is dull orange brown, hard, and durable in contact with the soil; it was used in the past for posts and rails, small boats and ox-yokes, though scarcity and small size limits current use. Some is still used for making furniture.
Source: Wikipedia, The Free Encyclopedia, (http://en.wikipedia.org/ : accessed 9 December 2007), "Sassafras albidum."

TESTAMENTARY GUARDIAN. A guardian appointed by the last will of a father for the person and real and personal estate of his child until the latter arrives of full age. 1 Bl. Comm. 462; 2 Kent, Comm. 224.
Source: Henry Campbell Black, Black's Law Dictionary, 1st edition, (Saint Paul, Minn.: West Publishing Co., 1891), 1166; image reprint, CD-ROM, A Dictionary Of Law (Columbia, Maryland: Archive CD Books USA, 2006).




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